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Maymester

Maymester runs from May 23 to June 10, 2022. Current students and non-matriculated students will be able to take one course with an HWS faculty member for 3.5 hours, five days a week. Classes are scheduled in the mornings (9 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.) or afternoons (1:30 p.m. – 5 p.m.).

 

The tuition for courses is $3,000 for current HWS students, including graduating seniors, and non-matriculated students. Courses will be either in-person or remote depending on the instructor’s preference and availability. Modality is listed with each course below or may be found in the PeopleSoft course listing.

HWS matriculated students can register through their HWS PeopleSoft account. Non-matriculated students should fill out a non-matriculated student application form and send it to Jamie MaKinster at MaKinster@hws.edu.

Contact

Jamie MaKinster
Associate Provost for Curricular Initiatives and Development and Professor of Education
Phone: (315) 781-3304
E-Mail: makinster@hws.edu

IMPORTANT DATES

Registration Period: April 14-May 9, 2022. For more information, click here. Late registration for courses may be permitted if seats remain. Please contact Jamie MaKinster at the email above.
First day of classes: May 23
Last day to drop/add a course: May 23
Last day to withdraw from a course: June 10
Last day to change grade status (graded to CR/DCR/NC): June 10
Last day of classes: June 10
Last day to change incomplete grades: August 26
No class on Memorial Day, Monday, May 30

COSTS

Tuition: $3000 per course
Room: $345
Meals: $555

Refund Policy

Notification of withdrawal and requests for refunds must be made in writing and addressed to the appropriate Dean. A full refund will be given to students who withdraw before the second day of classes. After this deadline, tuition/room/board charges and the return of federal and education loans and other sources of aid will be prorated based upon the percentage of the term that the student is enrolled. If the student is enrolled past 60% of the term, there is no refund of costs of attendance. The official withdrawal date used by the appropriate Dean’s Office will be used to determine the prorated refund.

Financial Aid

Tuition discounts are available to matriculated HWS students on a limited basis, based on demonstrated financial need (e.g., Pell eligibility).

Housing

Students may apply for summer housing here.

2022 Courses

Courses Offered (details below)
ARTS 274 Photographic Book Design
ECON 160 Principles of Economics
ECON 300 Macroeconomic Theory and Policy
ENV 216 Birds in Our Landscape
GEO 182 Intro to Meteorology
HIST 112 Soccer: Around the World with the Beautiful Game
MDSC 319 Listening to the Finger Lakes
MDSC 100 Intro to Media and Society
PSY 201 Statistics in the Psychological Sciences
PSY 203 Child Psychology
SOC 212 Data Analysis

ARTS 274 Photographic Book Design: Handmade and Self-Published Forms
In-Person Course
Art and Architecture
Professor Christine Chin
Students will create original photographic books from projects will be conceived, developed and captured during the course. Photographic techniques used will include both direct printing on light sensitive materials and lens-based digital photography. Book making will include the physical skills of cutting, sewing, and gluing as well as the use of digital design tools and archival inkjet printing. Throughout the course, the interrelation between photography and the book as a historical and artistic form will be considered through readings and artist examples. Projects for the course will teach skills in composition, sequencing, and aesthetics and the effective communication of concepts and ideas.
Note: DSLR cameras will be provided.

ECON 160 Principles of Economics
In-Person Course
Economics
Professor Jenny Tessendorf
ECON 160 Principles of Economics This course is the first course in economic theory. Microeconomic topics include supply and demand, comparative advantage, and consumer choice, the theory of the firm under competition and monopolies, and market failure. Macroeconomic topics include national income accounting, the determinants of national income, employment and inflation, the monetary system and the Fed, and fiscal policy. This course is required for all majors and minors in economics.

ECON 300 Macroeconomic Theory and Policy
In-Person Course
Economics
Professor Feisal Khan
This course examines in detail the major elements of aggregate economic analysis. The major focus is on the development of theoretical economic models that examine the interrelationships within the economic system. Once these models have been developed, they are used extensively to examine the current macroeconomic problems in the economic system, e.g., inflation, unemployment, economic growth, international balance of payments, the business cycle, and others. Prerequisite: ECON 160 and MATH 130 or equivalent, with a minimum grade of C-.

ENV 216 Birds in Our Landscape
Remote
Biology
Professor Mark Deutschlander
Birds are an apparent and familiar part of our environments, whether hiking in a national forest or spending time in our own backyards. From pristine natural areas to the most urban settings, birds are ubiquitous and serve as sentinels for the health of the environment. Examining population trends and geographical distributions of birds can help us understand the impacts of urbanization, pollution and pesticides, climate change, and more. In this course, you will learn how distributions of birds inform scientists about environmental change and the impacts of change on the function of ecosystems. You will learn, firsthand through field excursions and exercises, to identify local bird species and how to conduct some basic field techniques for direct monitoring of birds. You will learn how scientists collect distribution data on birds using remote sensing and how citizen science has greatly advanced our ability to understand the distributions and movements of birds. You will also learn how scientists communicate their findings by reviewing scientific publications, which we will use as case studies of how birds in our landscape impact us and tell us about our environments.

GEO 182 Intro to Meteorology
Remote
Geoscience
Professor Nick Metz
This course will introduce many of the important processes that operate within the Earth’s atmosphere that are important to sensible weather. By the end of this course, you will be able to understand processes that contribute to weather systems, distinguish the differences among a variety of severe weather types, and link severe weather events to people’s daily lives. There are no pre-reqs for GEO 182 during Maymester.

HIST 112 Soccer: Around the World with the Beautiful Game
Remote
History
Professor Virgil Slade
Soccer (football) is undisputedly the most popular sport in the world and is watched weekly by literally hundreds of millions of people across the globe. This game is said to foster community and is widely understood to generate affective relationships powerful enough to exceed the everyday social divisions which order the world we live in. However, what is not apparent in this rhetorical understanding of the ‘beautiful game’ is how soccer is also implicated in both creating and maintaining the very divides that it supposedly has the ability to transcend. This course provides a whirlwind tour of the sport that explores its industrial roots, its dissemination around the world, and with scheduled pit-stops on five continents, makes visible the sometimes hopeful. oftentimes violent. and always controversial nature of the beautiful game’s rich past.

MDSC 319 Listening to the Finger Lakes
In-Person Course
Media and Society
Professor Jiangtao Harry Gu
This course introduces students to the principles of audio storytelling and production while immersed in the Finger Lakes region. We will consider Indigenous ecologist and poet Robin Wall Kimmerer’s idea of “re-story-ation” and her argument that we can heal our relationship with our planet if we learn to hear its stories. We will collaborate with community members (Indigenous, local, or immigrant) to create a four-episode podcast about the Finger Lakes area. Each episode will take the form of a hike and chat with the invited guest through a nearby state park, farm, or conservation area, in the woods and meadows, along the lakes and streams. In producing this podcast, we will also examine concepts such as critical ecology, eco-feminism, and multi-species ethnography and their relevance to media and society. We will learn to appreciate the the interconnectedness of human and non-human beings and to enact reparative and ethical storytelling and listening in other contexts.

MDSC 100 Intro to Media and Society
Remote
Media and Society
Professor Lisa Patti
This course provides an introduction to various media and their modes, methods, and themes. We will explore the role of media in shaping social consciousness, global economies, and material culture. Examples drawn from film, television, print media, and digital environments will be contextualized, analyzed, and theorized as crucial elements of our media culture. Students will gain an appreciation for the social, cultural, economic, and political influences of global communications while performing close readings of conventional media objects. Writing assignments, exams, presentations, and projects will help to cement insights gained through close investigation of films, TV shows, advertisements, video games, music videos, and more.

PSY 201 Statistics in the Psychological Sciences
Remote
Psychological Sciences
Professor Michelle Rizzella
A survey of basic procedures for the organization and analysis of data. Topics in this course include basic univariate and bivariate descriptive statistics; hypothesis testing; and a variety of analyses used to examine data of single group, between group, within group, and factorial designs. PSY 201 substantially satisfies the quantitative reasoning goal and partially satisfies the scientific inquiry goal. Students interested in taking PSY 201 over Maymester for general credit may take it without the co-req PSY 202. Students planning to major/minor in the psychological sciences should plan to take PSY 202 in Fall 2022. Please contact Professor Rizzella for permission to enroll in PSY 202 in the fall.

PSY 203 Child Psychology
Remote
Psychological Science
Professor Julie Kingery
In PSY203, students will learn about the theories that guide the study of child development, as well as the physical, cognitive, social, and emotional changes that take place from infancy through late childhood. We will also consider contextual influences on development including parents, peers, schools, culture, and the media. Key themes emphasized throughout the semester include: 1) the interaction between genetics and the environment, 2) how children shape their own development, 3) the ways in which development is continuous (gradual) vs. discontinuous (occurs in stages), 4) the sequence and timing of developmental changes, 5) sociocultural factors, 6) individual differences, and 7) the use of research findings to promote children’s well-being. This course will involve lecture, small and large group discussions, in-class activities, videos, and child observations.

SOC 212 Data Analysis
Remote
Sociology
Professor Kendralin Freeman
In this course, you will learn to construct arguments about quantitative data using a variety of techniques all following the steps of the scientific method. This course provides an introduction to the organization and analysis of data in the process of social research. We will examine the presentation of data in tabular and graphic forms, the use of elementary descriptive and inferential statistics, and the use of bivariate and multivariate analytic procedures in the analysis of data. The course is ultimately intended to prepare students for original research efforts and to help them become more sophisticated consumers of social science. This course includes a three-hour lab that meets three days a week. 

ADDITIONAL FINANCIAL INFO

Loan Information
Students taking one class in the summer can apply for a private alternative loan to assist with the costs.

For more information regarding summer aid options, please contact the Financial Aid Office at 315-781-3315.