Students React to “Scattershot” – Hobart and William Smith Colleges \
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Students React to “Scattershot”

The recent Disability Awareness Month lectures by David Lovelace, author of “Scattershot” was featured in the Finger Lakes Times.

“Bipolar onset frequently occurs at 18 to 23, and I wanted my students to understand bipolar disorder from a personal perspective,” the article quotes Susan Pliner, director of the Center for Teaching and Learning at HWS, who has used Lovelace’s book in class and invited him to campus for the talk.

Several students from Pliner’s class are also included in the article, providing their reactions to the book.

“It was more raw than I expected when he described his experience,” Kelsey Crawford is quoted.

The full article follows.


Finger Lakes Times
Author shares bipolar experiences at HWS
Todd Etshman • April 5, 2009

GENEVA – In his 2008 book “Scattershot,” author David Lovelace describes his family’s lifelong struggles with bipolar disorder.

Now, Lovelace will speak about the book and the disorder at 7 p.m. Monday in the Sanford Room at Hobart and William Smith Colleges.

The event is free and open to the public.

Dr. Susan Pliner, director of the Center for Teaching and Learning at HWS, has used the book in her classroom and invited Lovelace to speak to students and community members.

“Bipolar onset frequently occurs at 18 to 23, and I wanted my students to understand bipolar disorder from a personal perspective,” Pliner explained.

She said the book has made for “phenomenal” class discussion.

William Smith first-year student Sarah Grossman said that after reading the book she was angry about the lack of medical attention available to those who suffer from manic depression.

“When [Lovelace’s] father had an episode, he tried to get medical help but there wasn’t room for him. It’s difficult for them to get the help they need. There isn’t enough money or doctors for it,” she said.

“I thought about how the family was unable to help each other through the disease and how they all reacted in a different way to being bipolar,” said fellow first-year student Hannah Hood.

“It was more raw than I expected when he described his experience,” said classmate Kelsey Crawford.

“Scattershot” was published in September 2008 by Dutton Books. It received a starred review from publications such as Publishers Weekly, and Lovelace was heard on National Public Radio in September.

“At its core, the transcendental manic experience remains one of great loneliness. It transcends, but it rarely translates,” Lovelace wrote in the book.

He will also speak to several HWS classes on Tuesday.
More information about Lovelace and his book can be found at www.davidlovelace.info.

Although March was officially Disabilities Awareness Month, Pliner said related events have continued into April.