Ecology Workshop Teaches Teachers – Hobart and William Smith Colleges \
The HWS Update

Ecology Workshop Teaches Teachers

A recent article in the Democrat and Chronicle featured the ecology workshop offered by the Finger Lakes Institute at HWS, funded with a grant from the Rochester Area Colleges Centers for Excellence in Science and Math. A total of 19 teachers boarded the William Scandling research vessel with Sheila Myers, education outreach coordinator for the Institute, canoed and hiked the Finger Lakes region to gain ideas and methods they could share with their students.

“A lot of this is teaching them scientific methods of studying lakes and aquatic resources,” said Myers.

The article also quoted one of the participants, Janet Siegel, a science teacher at the School Without Walls in the City School District, who participated in a Finger Lakes Institute program to bring her students aboard the William Scandling last year.

“I want urban kids to really understand where they live and what unique resources there are in our area and develop a sense of stewardship,” said Siegel.

The full article follows.


Democrat and Chronicle
Teachers get ecology lessons on Hemlock Lake

Bennett J. Loudon • Staff writer • August 5, 2009

A group of school teachers canoeing on Hemlock Lake Tuesday weren’t just enjoying a warm summer day. They were learning about the ecology of the region for use in their classrooms.

On Monday, the 19 teachers learned about Seneca Lake on board the William Scandling, a marine research vessel owned by Hobart and William Smith Colleges in Geneva, Ontario County.

The teachers will spend much of today in a laboratory at Hobart and William Smith analyzing water samples from Seneca and Hemlock lakes and learning how to present their data visually, another lesson they can pass on to their students.
The three-day program is offered by the Finger Lakes Institute, which was created five years ago to promote the protection of the Finger Lakes and to educate the public on the topic. The Institute is based at Hobart and William Smith.

The ecology workshop for the teachers is funded with a $14,000 grant from the Rochester Area Colleges Centers for Excellence in Science and Math. The group includes teachers from all over the region.

“A lot of this is teaching them scientific methods of studying lakes and aquatic resources,” said Sheila Myers, education outreach coordinator at the Finger Lakes Institute.

On Tuesday afternoon, the group hiked near Hemlock Lake, which has provided water to Rochester since the 1870s.

Janet Siegel, a science teacher at the School Without Walls in the City School District, took a group of students on the William Scandling research vessel last year.

“I want urban kids to really understand where they live and what unique resources there are in our area and develop a sense of stewardship,” said Siegel.
Randy French, a middle-school science teacher in the Geneseo Central School District, plans to bring his students to Hemlock Lake where they will deliver short presentations on a science topic. “They see things in books, but it doesn’t mean anything to them,” French said.

BLOUDON@DemocratandChronicle.com