Magee Authors Memo on Tibetan Plateau – Hobart and William Smith Colleges \
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Magee Authors Memo on Tibetan Plateau

In a blog, “Tibetan Plateau,” Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies Darrin Magee was noted as being one of four contributors to a series of memos on water security, policies and practices related to the Tibetan Plateau that are housed  at the University of British Columbia’s Institute of Asian Research.

Magee’s memo is available online.

Magee is a China geographer with expertise in water and energy in China. He earned an M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Washington, along with a B.A. in French and B.S. in mathematics from Louisiana State University. His doctoral dissertation was titled “New Energy Geographies: Powershed Politics and Hydropower Decision Making in Yunnan, China.” He has authored a number of articles on China’s water and energy, the most recent of which is “Salience and magnitude of dam impacts in small and large hydrodevelopment scenarios in China,” which appeared in the journal Water Alternatives. In September, 2011, he was selected as one of 20 Public Intellectuals Program Fellows by the National Committee on United States-China Relations.

The article about the Asia Pacific Memos follows, including a link to the series.


Tibetan Plateau
“Water, Scarcity, and the Frontiers on the Tibetan Plateau”

Tashi Tsering • October 23, 2011

The University of British Columbia’s Institute of Asian Research is publishing a series of four memos on water security, policies, and practices related to the Tibetan Plateau. This special series of Asia Pacific Memos titled “Water, Scarcity, and the Frontiers on the Tibetan Plateau” is guest edited edited by Tashi Tsering and Prof. Jack Hayes of Norwich University. Contributors, other than the two guest editors, include Prof. Kelly Alley of Auburn University and Prof. Darrin Magee of Hobart and William Smith Colleges.

The discourse on the implications of China’s plans to divert Tibet’s waters tends to portray a strategic issue of concern for downstream countries and/or the local Tibetans. The first memo on the series, which was published last week, “China’s Plans to Divert Water on the Tibetan Plateau,” makes a different argument: it is the Chinese people who will be adversely affected.

You can read this and the forthcoming memos on the series “Water, Scarcity, and the Frontiers on the Tibetan Plateau” online.