Lawyer, Advocate Gregory ’07 Profiled – Hobart and William Smith Colleges \
The HWS Update

Lawyer, Advocate Gregory ’07 Profiled

Peter J. Gregory ’07 was recently featured in the Rochester Business Journal as a rising young professional. He discussed his time at HWS and his experiences working with fellow alumDavid Gipner ’63 on the board of non-profit Quad A for Kids. Gregory is currently an associate attorney in the litigation group of McConville, Considine, Coorman & Morin P.C. Gipner and Gregory met when the two were members of the Alumni Board of Trustees for the Delta Chi fraternity at Hobart; Gipner recently recruited Gregory to Quad A’s board.

“Their board faced a generation gap,” Gregory is quoted in the article. “They wanted to bring in younger professionals.”

The article notes, “As a trial attorney, oration is a part of Gregory’s job-and he relishes it. At Hobart and William Smith Colleges, he was a member of the debate team and active in student government. He made fundraising cold calls for the alumni association and led admissions tours.”

Gregory earned a B.A. in political science with honors from Hobart College and minored in peer education in human relations. In addition to participating on the debate team and the student phonathon at HWS, Gregory was inducted into the Druids, was president of the College Republicans, a member of Hobart Student Government and Chimera, and served as an orientation mentor and resident adviser. He earned his J.D. from Albany Law School.

Gregory was also quoted in an article by the RBJ commenting on Paul Ryan’s selection as anticipated presidential candidate Mitt Romney’s running mate. That article is available online.

The full article from the Rochester Business Journal follows.


Rochester Business Journal
Speaking out for those less fortunate

As a trial attorney and community volunteer, Peter Gregory is at home.
Sally Parker • August 10, 2011

Peter Gregory grew up in Webster with much to be thankful for: close family and friends, an education at Allendale Columbia School and a cottage on Sodus Bay.

Now he’s paying it forward as a board member of Quad A for Kids, a privately funded after-school program for elementary students. Quad A offers arts and athletics to some 400 students at schools 4, 16, and 34 in Rochester. Students choose their activities, making the program unique at each school. Data show that children in the program have fewer behavior problems and better attendance during the school day, organizers say-and that’s good news in a district with a graduation rate below 50 percent.

“The goal is to set the building blocks for these kids to graduate from high school and go on to successful lives,” Gregory says.

Gregory, 27, is an associate attorney in the litigation group of McConville, Considine, Coorman & Morin P.C. His interest in Quad A was piqued when an older fellow Hobart Alumnus recruited him to be on the board of trustees.

“Their board faced a generation gap,” he says. “They wanted to bring in younger professionals.”

Gregory also is the youngest attorney in his workplace. McConville, Considine is a full-service law firm on the fourth and fifth floors of the Taiman Building, on East Main Street near Four Corners. The building is a prominent stop on city history tours because for 16 years abolitionist Fredrick Douglass operated ant-slavery newspapers on the building’s second floor, making it one of the few remaining structures in Rochester with a direct connection to the famed orator.

As a trial attorney, oration is a part of Gregory’s job-and he relishes it. At Hobart and William Smith Colleges, he was a member of the debate team and active in student government. He made fundraising cold calls for the alumni association and led admissions tours.

Gregory says a class on constitutional law in high school set his path.

“I enjoyed the analytical thinking that was required, and from that point on I knew I wanted to go to law school,” he says.

After he earned a B.A. in political science with honors in 2007, he immediately entered the Albany Law School. During a clerkship at a personal injury firm in Albany, he learned about litigation and found the adversarial nature of it appealing. He says trials are much less dramatic than television shows portray, but attorneys on both sides nonetheless come prepared for battle, having assembled all the necessary documents and statements before the trial takes place.

“You have to enjoy public speaking if you’re ever going to work in a courtroom,” he says.

The role of the juror is one Gregory regrets he’ll likely never get to play. Trial attorneys, current and former, are not likely to be picked to serve, he says.

“Some people might consider that a positive, but it’s something I’ve always wanted to do.”

After Gregory joined McConville, Considine in September 2010, he took the bar exam and worked as a law clerk until he was admitted as an associate six months later. He has worked on numerous cases with other attorneys and took over pending cases for a colleague involved in a six-week trial. This month he is scheduled to have his first trial as lead attorney, a case delayed six months due to a power outage on the initial date.

“Frankly, I’m looking forward to it. Closure is one of the biggest things a trial can bring about,” he says. It’s important to finally resolve your client’s concerns, whether they’re a defendant or a plaintiff.”

Gregory sees his role as that of advocate and adviser.

“People come to me in need of help. They rely on me to make the situation whole again. You can guide them through what can be a very stressful and strenuous situation.”

He has a desire to improve conditions for others, whether they are legal clients or young children. Gregory is excited about Quad A’s plans to expand its programs to reach more students.

“I had a world-class education at Allendale Columbia, so I feel an obligation to give back to children who may not have those opportunities,” he says.