Vanity Fair Features Alums’ Company – Hobart and William Smith Colleges \
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Vanity Fair Features Alums’ Company

Hand in Hand, a company founded by Bill Glaab ’06 and Courtney Apple ’08, was recently featured in Vanity Fair. The article notes the company is “leading the charge to change the world, one bar of soap at a time.” For every bar of soap purchased from Hand in Hand, a bar of soap and a month’s worth of clean water is donated to a child in a developing nation. “As of today, they have provided more than 140,000 bars of soap to Haitian children. But they don’t stop there. They also dig fresh wells, each of which provides 240 families with clean water every day for a decade. And as for the soaps, they are 100 percent natural, certified fair-trade, cruelty-free, biodegradable, vegan, and all made in America. In other words, they decided to not only give back to people when producing their product but give back to the environment as well,” writes Vanity Fair’s Alyssa Reeder. Apple, who is a freelance photographer, earned her B.A. in studio art magna cum laude from William Smith. She minored in Spanish and Hispanic studies and media and society and was inducted into Phi Beta Kappa. Apple participated in the semester abroad program to Ecuador and Peru. Glaab earned his B.A. in history and political science from Hobart College. He minored in integrated studies. As a student, he participated in the Washington, D.C. semester program and was twice named a Hobart Dean’s Scholar, which honors students for outstanding academic achievement. Prior to moving full-time to Hand in Hand, Glaab was a corporate sales executive with SNL Financial LC. The full article can be found online and features one of Apple’s photographs. The text also follows. Vanity FairBuy One, Give One: Hand in Hand Pays It Forward Alyssa Reeder • October 1, 2014 It wasn’t until recently, I’m somewhat ashamed to admit, that I began to realize exactly to what degree the beauty industry plays in raising awareness for environmental causes. Joined by many other brands, Hand in Hand is a unique company that is leading the charge to change the world, one bar of soap at a time. Its founders-husband and wife Bill Glaab and Courtney Apple-started their business under a very simple model: buy a bar, give a bar. Think of them as the Tom’s of beauty, the Warby Parker of hygiene. Fueled by the jarring statistic that five million children die each year from water-related illnesses, Hand in Hand has partnered with the World-Wide Child Advocacy Group, My Neighbor’s Children to donate to numerous orphanages in Haiti. As of today, they have provided more than 140,000 bars of soap to Haitian children. But they don’t stop there. They also dig fresh wells, each of which provides 240 families with clean water every day for a decade. And as for the soaps, they are 100 percent natural, certified fair-trade, cruelty-free, biodegradable, vegan, and all made in America. In other words, they decided to not only give back to people when producing their product but give back to the environment as well. “Understanding our environmental impact, we wanted to be proud of our soap and develop a product that was made with sustainable resources and harvested ethically,” says Glaab. The soaps, scrubs, lotions, candles, and lip balms are all made with the same integrity, to sustain a greater purpose. But it doesn’t hurt that they are, to put it simply, really great products. They come in scents like Rose Water, Sea Salt, White Tea, Lavender, Wildflower and Fern, and Orange Blossom-and it’s a breath of fresh air to know the fragrance is natural. Personal favorites? The Sea Salt Shea Lip Butter (it has a minty tingle and completely soothes your chapped lips) and the Rose Water Sugar Scrub (subtly scented and moisturizing, without feeling oily). So, think past the mirror, and support a cause that gives back. Here, Hand in Hand documents their first well being built in Haiti. For every product purchased, Hand in Hand saves 50 square feet of rain forest, and donates one bar of soap and one month’s clean water to a child in a developing nation.  

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