Judge Rosen Appointed – Hobart and William Smith Colleges \
The HWS Update

Judge Rosen Appointed

The Hon. Larry Rosen ’69 has been appointed assigned counsel administrator for Albany County, responsible for assisting with oversight for legal services to those who cannot afford an attorney. “I am pleased and honored Judge Rosen has agreed to take on this new challenge. Over the years he has shown a deep understanding of the law, compassion for his fellow citizens and a love for this community. We are fortunate to have him. He has devoted his life to the law and the principle of equal justice under the law,” said Albany County Executive Daniel McCoy. “Going forward our mission will be two-fold: to provide the best legal representation possible to those who need it and to ensure that taxpayers dollars are spent efficiently.” Rosen earned a B.A. in political science from Hobart College and was inducted into Phi Beta Kappa. As a student, he was a member of the basketball team. He went on to earn his J.D. from Duke University School of Law and served as Albany City Court Judge and Albany County Court Judge before entering private practice in 2001. An article announcing his appointment is available online and below. The RecordFormer judge to serve as Albany County assigned counsel administratorDanielle Sanzone • October 6, 2014 ALBANY — A former judge has been appointed to serve Albany County as the Assigned Counsel Administrator to assist with providing oversight for legal services to those who cannot afford an attorney. Larry Rosen was announced to fill this position at a news conference Friday. Rosen, a graduate of Hobart College and Duke’s Law School, served as Albany City Court judge from 1985 to 1994 and then as Albany County Court Judge from 1995 to 2001, at which point he entered private practice but continued to provide advice and guidance in criminal justice matters, Rosen said. “County Executive McCoy is passionately committed to twin propositions: Firstly, that indigent criminal defendants receive a first-rate defense and secondly, that Albany County taxpayers not bear an unfair burden in providing such defense,” said Rosen. “Given these progressive and laudable goals and given the enormity of the problem, I deemed it my civic responsibility to accept the County Executive’s invitation to join his team and spearhead efforts to solve this problem.” Rosen will be responsible for: assisting the county in developing and maintaining a list of attorneys for each court to use in order to determine those who will provide appropriate representation and have expertise in particular types of cases; developing standards, guidelines, training and supervision of attorneys on the Assigned Counsel Panel; reviewing each voucher submitted to the court for payment to ensure the services rendered were provided and that the amount paid represents the entirety of the work done on the client’s behalf; and working with each court to make certain that only those who truly need legal representation are appointed an attorney, officials said. The use of 18-B or assigned counsel is mandated when the Public Defender and Alternate Public Defender are not eligible to represent an indigent client in the county. The law provides a mechanism for the court to appoint a lawyer at county expense and under current practice only the court can determine if an 18-B attorney is needed. Once the case is complete, the court then approves payment to the attorney. Rosen’s new role will be to oversee the assigned counsel program and to provide accountability and transparency in the program. Because of an ethics opinion from the New York State Bar Association, the county Public Defender and Alternate Public Defender are precluded from supervising or reviewing any actions by an 18-B attorney. The county currently has no way to ensure accountability. In 2013, Albany County paid $1.2 million for 18-B attorneys and in 2012 the county paid $1.1 million with no oversight, McCoy said. “I am pleased and honored Judge Rosen has agreed to take on this new challenge. Over the years he has shown a deep understanding of the law, compassion for his fellow citizens and a love for this community. We are fortunate to have him. He has devoted his life to the law and the principle of equal justice under the law,” said McCoy, noting that the county is working with state officials on possibly making this a position or program that would be found statewide. “Going forward our mission will be two-fold: to provide the best legal representation possible to those who need it and to ensure that taxpayers dollars are spent efficiently.” Rosen’s salary for the part-time position will be about $50,000, with another $20,000 for expenses. The Albany County Public Defender James Milstein stated, “Judge Rosen is an excellent selection and will help ensure that Albany County will continue to provide excellent representation to indigent clients in the most efficient manner.” McCoy is expected to present an approximately $600 million county budget next Friday. Danielle Sanzone may be reached at 270-1292.