Atkinson Eames ’83 in Boston Globe – Hobart and William Smith Colleges \
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Atkinson Eames ’83 in Boston Globe

Elizabeth Atkinson Eames ’83 was recently featured in The Boston Globe for her latest award-winning “tween” book series. “The Sugar Mountain Snow Ball” is due out next year and another pending release in 2016. “There is so much out there that is full of angst and dark feelings,” Atkinson Eames says. “I try to give kids hope and make them laugh a little at life and themselves.” Atkinson Eames earned a B.A. in anthropology cum laude from William Smith College. As a student, she was a member of the tennis team and participated in dance and Little Theatre. She studied abroad in Sri Lanka. Atkinson Eames went on to earn her master’s of arts degree in liberal studies (with a concentration in creative writing) from Dartmouth College. More information about her books is available online: elizabethatkinson.com. The full article from The Boston Globe is available online and below. The Boston GlobeEasing the tough ‘tween’ yearsWendy Killeen • Globe Correspondent • October 19, 2014 “It was a hard time for me,” Elizabeth Atkinson said of being 11 years old. “I was the smallest in my class. I was shy. I felt invisible and was silent. And not good at anything.” Then she discovered the Judy Blume book, “Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret.” “I was astounded there was a book that expressed my thoughts,” Atkinson said. “It was so exciting. It empowered me and changed my life. “I thought I would love to [write a book like that] someday.” That’s exactly what Atkinson, 53, (below) of West Newbury, has been doing since 2006. Her award-winning “tween” books (elizabethatkinson.com ) are for ages 9 to 12. They include “Alice to Zen and Everyone In Between,” about an unusual friendship between a new girl in town and a peculiar neighborhood boy, and “I, Emma Freke,” about a girl who realizes her name – spoken aloud – has become her identity. Atkinson has a new book, “The Sugar Mountain Snow Ball,” due out next year, and another will be released in 2016. “There is so much out there that is full of angst and dark feelings,” said Atkinson, the mother of two grown children. “I try to give kids hope and make them laugh a little at life and themselves.” Atkinson said her characters may be quirky, “but kids all need and want the same things – to be accepted and have good friendships and feel good about themselves.” She wants her young readers to know “This is the hardest time of life, but it will get better.” Atkinson visits libraries and classrooms – some around the country via Skype – and leads creative writing workshops for students. “I love talking to kids and hearing their thoughts and ideas about life,” she said. “It’s so nice when I connect with a young person and can do for them what Judy Blume did for me all those years ago.” Wendy Killeen can be reached at wdkilleen@gmail.com.    

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