A&E Documentary Features Dinosaur Dig of Hobart Grad – Hobart and William Smith Colleges \
The HWS Update

A&E Documentary Features Dinosaur Dig of Hobart Grad

“The Lost Dinosaurs of Egypt” will air tonight on the A&E Network featuring Matthew C. Lamanna, a 1997 graduate of Hobart College, who participated in the Sahara Desert dig.

GENEVA, N.Y.—The A&E network is promoting its upcoming documentary as a real-life “Indiana Jones” adventure. The documentary will feature Matthew C. Lamanna, a Hobart graduate and native of Waterloo, N.Y, who was a member of the team of paleontologists from the University of Pennsylvania that uncovered a new species of dinosaur called Paralititan Stromeri in the Sahara Desert in 2000.

The first airing of the two-hour documentary will be shown at 9 p.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 8. The A&E Network funded the dig and accompanied the team on their seven-week expedition through sandstorms and the hot sun of the Sahara Desert.

“The Lost Dinosaurs of Egypt” will be shown again at 1 a.m. on Wednesday, Oct. 9; 9 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 12; and 1 a.m. on Sunday, Oct. 13; and finally at 5 p.m. on Sunday, Oct. 13. The expedition has also since been the feature of a book “The Lost Dinosaurs of Egypt” written by William Nothdurft with Josh Smith and Matt Lamanna.

Lamanna is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Earth and Environmental Science at the University of Pennsylvania, and a research associate at the Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia. He received a B.S. with high honors in geoscience and biology from Hobart College in 1997, and an M.S. in earth and environmental science from the University of Pennsylvania in 1999. He is part of the Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoecology research group, working with Dr. Peter Dodson of the School of Veterinary Medicine and the Department of Earth and Environmental Science. His dissertation focuses on the systematics and biogeography of Cretaceous dinosaurs from Argentina and Egypt.

Last year, Lamanna returned to Hobart and William Smith Colleges to present a public lecture on his discovery.
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