Distinguished Faculty Award Honors Joseph DiGangi and the late Eugene Murphy – Hobart and William Smith Colleges \
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Distinguished Faculty Award Honors Joseph DiGangi and the late Eugene Murphy

Joseph P. DiGangi, who founded the Washington, D.C., off campus study program, and the late Eugene F. Murphy, who received acclaim from the French government for services to the French culture and French studies at Hobart and William Smith, will be honored with the Distinguished Faculty Award this year at the Colleges.

September 16, 2002 GENEVA, N.Y.—The Distinguished Faculty Award this year honors Joseph P. DiGangi, a professor political science at the Colleges from 1967 to 1997, and the late Eugene F. Murphy, a professor of modern languages at the Colleges from 1959 to 1985. DiGangi and Murphy's daughter Maureen DuMont will receive the award on Friday, Sept. 27, at a dinner ceremony. The Distinguished Faculty Award honors outstanding teachers at Hobart and William Smith Colleges, and is presented jointly by the Hobart Alumni Association and the William Smith Alumnae Association.

A panel discussion in their honor about off campus study programs, moderated by Marie-France Etienne, professor of modern languages, Craig Rimmerman, professor of political science, and Amy Diamond Barnes '75, who studied in France with Eugene Murphy, will be held at 4:30 p.m. on Friday, Sept. 27, in the Geneva Room on the Colleges campus. The panel discussion is free and the public is invited to attend.

Born in New Brunswick, N.J. in November of 1941, DiGangi received his bachelor's degree with distinction in political science from Lehigh University and his Ph.D. in public law and government from Columbia University. DiGangi came to Geneva in the fall of 1967 to begin his tenure with Hobart and William Smith Colleges, under the direction of Maynard Smith, then head of the political science department.

DiGangi quickly became involved in more than teaching, by being elected as a faculty Senator and selected as a member of a new committee to review Hobart's AFROTC program during the spring of 1969. DiGangi went on to chair the political science department and serve on most of the Colleges committees, including the President's Advisory Council, Academic Affairs and the Committee on Faculty. Fellow faculty members frequently elected DiGangi to serve on presidential, provost and dean search committees.

In 1985, DiGangi was a co-founder and supervisor of the Washington, D.C., off-campus semester program concentrating on public policy, which was established to allow middle-year students the opportunity to participate in intense classroom instruction combined with hands-on experience through internships in various government and public service offices throughout the capital district. In addition to teaching the Washington, D.C. semester, DiGangi taught in the London term abroad. He is an elected member of the Hobart Druid Society and chosen by the students to be the Class Day speaker in 1995. DiGangi also received the “Faculty Excellence in Teaching” Award in 1993.

DiGangi was a member of the Board of Trustees of the Geneva Historical Society and served as chair of the collections committee. In addition, he was a director of the Savings Bank of the Finger Lakes. Now retired and residing in the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area, DiGangi frequently goes to the Hill to attend Supreme Court oral arguments and Congressional committee hearings. He is a member of the Patron's Circle at the Kennedy Center, the Washington Opera Guild, the Corcoran Gallery, the Phillips Collection, the Smithsonian Institution and the Washington Performing Arts Society.

Murphy, was born in Syracuse, N.Y. He was a 1941 graduate of the University of Toronto, where he graduated first in his class. He received his Ph.D. from The Johns Hopkins University in 1951. He taught at Grinnell College from 1946 until 1948, at The Johns Hopkins University from 1948 until 1954 and at the University of South Carolina from 1954 until 1959. From 1959 on, he was professor and head of the Department of Modern Languages at Hobart and William Smith Colleges until his retirement in 1985.

Murphy served as a naval officer in the Pacific in World War II. He was well published with articles and reviews in “Modern Language Notes,” “Modern Language Journal,” “The Explicator,” “Renaissance,” “Book Abroad,” “South Atlantic,” “Modern Language Association Bulletin,” the “Torch,” “The Classical Journal,” “Angora,” and the “Classical Outlet”. He also lectured throughout the United States.

Murphy was a member of Phi Beta Kappa, Phi Sigma Iota, and Pi Delta Phi. He was awarded a Fulbright Scholarship to France in 1951. He received the Russell Award for Distinguished Teaching at the University of South Carolina in 1959. In 1980 he was awarded the Faculty Teaching Prize from Hobart and William Smith Colleges. In 1967, Murphy received the Ordre des Palmes Academiques, an award from the French government for “Services to the French culture and for the high quality of French studies at Hobart and William Smith Colleges”. In 1985, he was awarded an honorary degree at Hobart and William Smith Colleges.

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Please also visit the Distinguished Faculty Award page.