Colleges Students Perform ‘Judgment Day’ – Hobart and William Smith Colleges \
The HWS Update

Colleges Students Perform ‘Judgment Day’

A devastating portrait of small-town life, provincial hypocrisy and murder by one of Austria's leading playwrights will be performed at Hobart and William Smith Colleges.

(October 16, 2003) GENEVA, N.Y.–The play “Judgment Day,” by Austrian dramatist Ödön von Horvath, will be performed at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Friday and Saturday, Oct. 23, 24, 25, in Bartlett Theatre, Coxe Hall. Admission is free for Colleges students; general admission is $5. Tickets are available at the Coxe Hall box office one hour before curtain.

The play's main character Thomas Hudetz lives a quiet life, admired by everyone in his small town as the perfect stationmaster in their small, isolated town. When a mischievous young woman distracts him from his responsibilities with a badly-timed kiss, however, his carefully composed world explodes. Many innocent lives are lost in a train disaster, and Hudetz is suspected of having neglected his duty. In the official inquiry that follows, irresponsibility leads to perjury, and Thomas is soon on his way to committing another, far more serious offense.

The play is directed by Robert F. Gross, professor of comparative literature. Members of the cast include senior Timothy Mele as Thomas Hudetz, first-year Jamie Agnello as Josephine Hudtez (his wife), senior Mike Nolan as Alfons (her brother), first-year Laura Geisenheimer as Anna Lechner, senior Matthew Johnston as The Landlord (her father), senior Evan Griswold as Ferdinand (her fiance), senior Heather Harris as Leni, junior Andrew Holt as Policeman, junior Kate Delp as Traveling Salesperson, first-year Matthew Menter as Kohut, sophomore Quinn Hurley as Prosecutor, first-year Joe McDonald as Pokorny, and first-year Vanessa Crans as Mrs. Leimgruber.

Born December 9, 1901, in Fiume, Hungaria, Horvath studied in Budapest and Vienna before choosing Germany as his adopted homeland. Disturbed by the political climate, Horvath took up playwriting and launched a vicious attack on fascism. His theatrical activities also brought him to the attention of the men he was attacking, and in 1933, Horvath was forced to flee Germany, fearing for his life. Horvath relocated to Austria where he continued to write both plays and novels.

###