Fisher Center Announces Spring 2004 Events – Hobart and William Smith Colleges \
The HWS Update

Fisher Center Announces Spring 2004 Events

Continuing the theme “Global Education, Educating Globally,” the Fisher Center for the Study of Women and Men announces four events for the spring semester.

Andrew Boyd will present “Culture Jamming 101” from 7:30 until 9 p.m. on Wednesday, Jan. 28, in the Geneva Room. Grassroots publicist, activist, and author Andrew Boyd uses guerrilla theater, media stunts, and creative direct action to fight social and economic injustice and inequalities. Hailed as a “master satirist” and “committed humorist,” Boyd's creativity, wit, and energy electrify his lectures and workshops as much as they mobilize his direct action. As Phil T. Rich, he was one of the driving forces behind Billionaires for Bush (or Gore,), the Million Billionaire March, and now billionairesforbush.com. His street theater and media stunts such as 100 Musical Chairs (a human bar-graph of economic inequality), and Precision Cell Phone Drill Team (corporate executives in power suits on military style maneuvers) derive from his intellectual approach of “grabbing a powerful idea from culture or the academy, turning it inside-out, putting a handle and a grin on it, and sending it back out there.” Founder and director of the arts and action program United for a Fair Economy, he is also author of The Activist Cookbook, a source-book for activist workshops, and, most recently, Daily Afflictions: The Agony of Being Connected to Everything in the Universe,” and “Truth is a Virus: Meme Warfare and the Billionaires for Bush (or Gore),” a chapter in Cultural Resistance. His writings on global resistance movements and their use of the internet have been featured in The Nation and the Village Voice. Boyd teaches at New York University, and his current book-in-progress is Enlightened Machismo.

Available readings: The Activist Cookbook; Daily Afflictions: The Agony of Being Connected to Everything in the Universe; Life's Little Deconstruction Book: Self Help For the Post Hip

Open roundtable discussion with Andrew Boyd at 8:45 a.m., Thursday morning, The Fisher Center, 212 Demarest Hall.

Workshop with Andrew Boyd, Thursday morning, 10:30 a.m., The Fisher Center, 212 Demarest Hall (sign up in advance).

Zarqa Nawaz will present “Putting Fun Back into FUNdamentalism” (films and talk) at 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 18, in the Geneva Room. Canadian Muslim filmmaker and journalist Zaraq Nawaz has created a trilogy of films she calls “terrordies” — comedies about terrorism — to confront stereotypes associated with Muslims. Her production company FUNdamental Films's motto “to put fun back into fundamentalism” supplies the title of her talk in which Nawaz will introduce her films and discuss their development. Described as having a “satirical bent of mind,” her films deploy loads of wit to examine stereotypes of Muslims as terrorists, wife abusers and religious extremists. Her film BBQ Muslims was inspired by the media flurry and finger pointing at the Muslim community for the Oklahoma City bombing, and Death Threat by the “fatwa (decree) issued by religious clerics against Salman Rushdie and Bangladeshi author Taslima Nasreen for their writings” (Radhika, 2003). Nawaz has worked as a freelance writer/broadcaster with CBC radio, and as associate producer on a number of CBC programs, including Morningside. She has also worked with CTV's Canada AM, and CBC's The National, and won the Chairman's Award in Radio Production for her radio documentary, The Changing Rituals of Death. Her films have premiered at the Toronto International Film Festivals, and have acquired cult status. Her current work is on a feature film, Real Terrorists Don't Belly Dance, where she continues to break down repressive and oppressive views of Islamic religion and of Muslim women and men.

Available films: BBQ Muslims; Death Threat

Open roundtable discussion with Zarqa Nawaz, Thursday morning, 8:45 a.m., The Fisher Center, 212 Demarest Hall.

Nelly Peñaloza Stromquist will give “21st Century Women: Confronting Postmodernity and Globalization” at 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, March 4, in the Geneva Room. Professor of Education at the Rossier School of Education and affiliated scholar in the Center for Feminist Research and Gender Studies at the University of Southern California, Nelly Stromquist researches issues related to international development, education and gender. Specializing in questions concerned with gender, equity policies, educational innovations, and adult education in developing countries, particularly Latin America and West Africa, Stromquist is a foremost author on the question of education and globalization, and she also writes on literacy for women's citizenship. From her critical feminist approach, Stromquist examines postmodernism and globalization, including their implications for pedagogical and political practice within institutions of higher education. Her new book focuses on how transnational corporations directly and indirectly hold political influence on education and culture, and on transformations in ideas of education and of the university. Stromquist has most recently published Education in a Globalized World: The Connectivity of Economic Power, Technology, and Knowledge, and co-edited Distant Alliances: Promoting Education for Girls and Women in Latin America, Globalization and Culture: Integration and Contestation Across Countries, Politics of Educational Innovation in Developing Countries: An Analysis of Knowledge and Power, and Women in the Third World: An Encyclopedia of Contemporary Issues.

Available readings: Education in a Globalized World: The Connectivity of Economic Power, Technology, and Knowledge; Distant Alliances: Promoting Education for Girls and Women in Latin America; Globalization and Culture: Integration and Contestation Across Countries; Politics of Educational Innovation in Developing Countries: An Analysis of Knowledge and Power; Women in the Third World: An Encyclopedia of Contemporary Issues

Open roundtable discussion with Nelly Peñaloza Stromquist, Friday morning, 8:45 a.m., The Fisher Center, 212 Demarest Hall.

Rabab Abdulhadi will present “Critical Pedagogy, Cultures of Resistance, and Thought Police: Teaching Gender and Sexuality in the Time of War” at 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday, April 7, in the Geneva Room. Assistant professor in the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality at New York University, Rabab Abdulhadi will examine the place of pedagogy in oppositional cultures. Drawing on her research in the United States, Palestine and the rest of the Arab world, including Iraq, she will focus on the function of criticism and critical thinking when policing mechanisms are tightened. Abdulhadi thus inquires into oppositional cultural spaces under current conditions of national security. Her doctoral dissertation was a comparative study of the changed meaning of Palestinianness before and after the creation of Palestinian self-rule areas in parts of the West Bank and the Gaza Strip. Abdulhadi is currently director of a collaborative research initiative on gender and sexuality studies between the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality at New York University and partners in the Middle East, Central Asia, Southern Africa, South East Asia and Latin America. Her publications include editor of a special issue of International Journal of Sociology on Arab sociology, articles including, “Where is Home? Fragmented Llives, Border Crossing, and the Politics of Exile;” “Nomadic Existence: Gender, Exile and Palestine;” and “The Palestinian Women's Autonomous Movement: Emergence, Dynamics, and Challenges.” She is currently completing two books, Cultures of Resistance and the Post-Colonial State, and The Limitations of Nationalism: Gender Dynamics and the Emergent Palestinian Feminist Discourses.

Available readings: “Where is Home? Fragmented Lives, Border Crossing, and the Politics