HWS Chemistry Students Present at National Meeting – Hobart and William Smith Colleges \
The HWS Update

HWS Chemistry Students Present at National Meeting

The 228th American Chemical Society national meeting features Colleges' work

(Oct. 11, 2004) GENEVA, N.Y.–Twelve students, one alumna, and three faculty members from Hobart and William Smith Colleges recently traveled to Philadelphia to present their research at the 228th American Chemical Society national meeting. The society had a total attendance of more than 15,000 scientists during the six-day meeting in August.

The HWS chemistry department faculty members believe that collaborative research experiences between faculty and students are of utmost importance. All chemistry majors participate in research while at HWS and are encouraged to present their work at both regional and national meetings, as well as to strive to publish their work as undergraduates.

The American Chemical Society, based in Washington, D.C., is a nonprofit, scientific and educational organization and the largest scientific society in the world. Chartered by Congress, the ACS is a world leader in fostering chemical education and research. Its membership of nearly 160,000 chemists and chemical engineers is international.

The students participated in summer research programs under the supervision of Professors Christine de Denus, Carol Parish or Erin Pelkey. Following is a list of the student participants and the title of the paper he or she presented.

Hilda CastilloHilda S. Castillo, a William Smith senior from New York, N.Y., presented “Conformational Analysis of Potent HIV Protease Inhibitors.” Castillo is a biochemistry major with a double minor in education and Spanish. Her current research involves looking at the quantum mechanical behavior and tautomerization of enediyne anticancer warhead drugs. She has presented at the other National American Chemical Society conferences, at the Undergraduate Chemistry Research Symposium, and in spring 2002, she chaired a session during the American Chemical Society's regional research symposium, held on the HWS campus. Castillo is the recipient of a Pfizer Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship and summer research fellowships sponsored by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the American Chemical Society. Other honors include the Chemical Rubber Company's First-Year Chemistry Achievement Award and several HWS academic awards. Castillo was recently named an American Chemical Society Scholar. The daughter of Felix and Alex Castillo, she plans to pursue a Ph.D. in biochemistry upon graduation from HWS.

Eric CohenEric A. Cohen, a Hobart senior from Spokane, Wash., presented “Synthetic Approach to Truncated Analogs of Staurosporinone (K-252C).” Cohen is a chemistry major (biochemistry concentration) and environmental studies minor. His research involves developing synthetic methods for the preparing of arylnitromethane compounds, key intermediates in the synthesis of staurosporinone analogs and Vioxx analogs. The son of Drs. Arnold Cohen and Colleen Carey of Spokane, Wash., he plans to attend dental school upon graduation from HWS.

Heather CondursoHeather L. Condurso, a William Smith sophomore from Montville, N.J., presented “Preparation of 4'-Substituted Terpyridine Ligands.” Condurso was one of two summer research students who were participating in the program following their first year of college. She is planning to major in chemistry and to pursue graduate studies. Condurso was the recipient of a Provost Summer Research Fellowship. She is a member of the chemistry club and a student affiliate of the American Chemical Society. She is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Bartholomew Condurso.

Angela DannAngela S. Dann, a William Smith senior from Marathon, N.Y., presented “Interactions of Ruthenium Chloride Complexes and Substituted Terpyridine Compounds.” Her research is focused on the synthesis of new materials that may be used in future electronic devices. Dann has presented her work at previous American Chemical Society meetings and at the annual Summer Science Research symposium held on campus. She has been a recipient of a 2002 Merck/American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Summer Research Fellowship, as well as a 2003 Patchett Summer Research Fellowship. This past summer she was a recipient of a NSF Research Experience for Undergraduates in Polymer Interfaces and Macromolecular Assemblies, at IBM laboratories, Calif. She is a midfielder for the William Smith Heron's field hockey team, a volunteer for the Geneva Community Lunch Program, a member of the chemistry club, and is a student affiliate of the American Chemical Society. She has also made the Dean's List for her academic achievements. She is the daughter of James and Shari Dann, of Marathon, N.Y. She plans to pursue a Ph.D. in chemistry after graduation.

Matt GarmanMatthew J. Garman, a Hobart junior of Wexford, Pa., presented “Metal-Mediated Approach to the Aristolactam Alkaloids.” Garman is a double major in biology and chemistry. His research focused on developing a novel method for putting together naturally occurring heterocyclic molecules known as the aristolactam alkaloids. He worked out a protocol for preparing a key alkynyl ester intermediate that is five synthetic steps from the natural product (cepharanone A). Garman is a member of the Hobart hockey team. The son of Laura and Willis Garman of Pittsburgh, Pa., he plans to attend medical school upon graduation from HWS.

Nicolette GuthrieNicolette J. Guthrie, a William Smith senior from Durham, N.H., presented “Synthesis of 3-Pyrrolin-2-one Analogs of Vioxx.” Guthrie is a chemistry major (biochemistry concentration) and environmental studies minor. Her research involved developing a new synthesis of 3,4-diaryl 3-pyrrolin-2-ones, potential anti-inflammatory agents. During this past summer, she completed the synthesis of a Vioxx analog containing a 3-pyrrolin-2-one structure. The daughter of Ronald and Jean Guthrie, she is the current president of the chemistry club. After graduation from HWS, she plans to pursue a Ph.D. in chemistry.

Michael LiquoriMichael E. Liquori, a Hobart senior from Marcellus, N.Y., presented “Preparation and Reactions of N-Methyl-N-Phenyl-Isocyanoacetamide.” Liquori is majoring in chemistry (biochemistry concentration) and environmental studies minor. His research also focused on developing a novel method for putting together natural products known as the aristolactam alkaloids. He worked out a protocol for preparing a key alkynyl carboxylic acid intermediate that is four synthetic steps from the natural product (cepharanone B). Liquori, the son of Lori Hale and Michael Liquori, both of Syracuse, is planning to work in the pharmaceutical industry upon graduation from HWS before eventually attending medical school.

Max MacalusoMax Macaluso, a Hobart junior from Canandaigua, N.Y., presented “Quantum Mechanical Studies of Enediyne Tautomers.” His project looks at the electronic structure of anti-cancer enediyne warhead drugs and the role tautomerization plays in the cyclization. Macaluso is the recipient of a 2003 Merck/AAAS Summer Research Fellowship, as well as a 2004 Patchett Summer Research Fellowship. Previously, he had presented his results at the 2003 Molecular Educational and Research Cons