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The HWS Update

Tyler Fuller ’18 is finishing his fourth year in medical school at SUNY Upstate Medical University’s Rural Medical Scholars Program. He completed his pediatrics, emergency medicine, family medicine and surgical rotations in the Finger Lakes. At the height of the pandemic, Tyler Fuller ’18 continued to pursue his goal of becoming a physician in order

In the fall, Matthew Nardone ’21 will attend Syracuse University to pursue a master’s in audio arts. Building on his double majors of biochemistry and music, Matthew Nardone ’21 looks forward to graduate work at Syracuse University’s Audio Arts program. “Part of me always wanted to work in the behind-the-scenes parts of the music industry, but

Four recent Hobart and William Smith alums have been admitted to some of the premier dental schools in the world, including programs at Harvard and the University of Pennsylvania. Between his coursework and summers “shadowing dentists and volunteering at health clinics,” Bartolomeo Voto ’21 is “confident that my time at HWS has prepared me for

With the support of a prestigious scholarship, Charlie Widing ’22 will research water purification techniques at the Technological University of Berlin this summer. Charlie Widing ’22, who has been studying water filtration at HWS, is the recipient of a Research Internship in Science and Engineering (RISE) from the German Academic Exchange Service. His three-month internship

“HWS research students are not laboratory assistants; they are co-investigators into our unknown world. They design experiments, collaborate within their labs, with other labs on campus often from other departments, and with labs at other institutions. Thanks to the Sherman Fairchild Foundation’s support and other ongoing initiatives, we anticipate the number of research students on campus this summer to reach an all-time high,” says Associate Dean for Faculty Development and Affairs Joe Rusinko.

Using water pressure and a series of filters, reverse osmosis is a common method of water purification. But as Noah Kilmer ’21 explained in his recent Senior Symposium presentation, it “has been plagued by biofouling, which is the buildup of biological material that makes the membrane less efficient, much like the buildup of leaves at the end of a gutter.”

Sarah Lewicki ’21 is the recipient of a prestigious award that will support up to two years of hands-on biomedical research training at the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. This spring, the National Institutes of Health selected Sarah Lewicki ’21 for a highly competitive Postbaccalaureate Intramural Research Training Award. The award

“The wealth of opportunity and academic rigor here at HWS have been crucial in preparing me for this next step. I am extremely grateful to my coaches, professors, friends and family for helping me along the way,” says Alec Robitaille ’21.

Professor of Biology Meghan Brown imagined the fictional species at the heart of bestselling-author Jeff VanderMeer’s latest novel, Hummingbird Salamander, which they will discuss in an interview next week. In Jeff VanderMeer’s Hummingbird Salamander, which will be published April 6, a mysterious envelope sends “Jane Smith” on a dangerous, complex quest revolving around a taxidermied hummingbird

A new study led by Professor of Biology Meghan Brown documents that Cuba is home to hundreds fewer invasive plant species than expected. Why does Cuba have comparatively fewer invasive plant species than its Caribbean neighbors? Its economic isolation during the past 60 years is a major factor that limited the arrival and establishment of plants