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The HWS Update

In the fall, Matthew Nardone ’21 will attend Syracuse University to pursue a master’s in audio arts. Building on his double majors of biochemistry and music, Matthew Nardone ’21 looks forward to graduate work at Syracuse University’s Audio Arts program. “Part of me always wanted to work in the behind-the-scenes parts of the music industry, but

Biology major Taylor Szatko ’21 accepted into Master of Science focusing on Adolescence Education. Taylor Szatko ’21, who majored in biology and minored in health professions and education, has begun a Master of Science in Education program in adolescence education at St. Bonaventure University. In this program, Szatko intends to deepen her understanding of developmental

Rylee Wernoch ’21 has secured a position at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center through the Chesapeake Conservation Corps. In a position hosted by the Chesapeake Conservation Corps, Rylee Wernoch ’21 has joined a cohort of 30 recent college graduates who are working to conserve the Chesapeake Bay. Wernoch will work at the Smithsonian Environmental Research

Graduating magna cum laude in biology with a minor in economics, Amelia Smith ’21 has landed an internship with the House of Representatives Committee on Natural Resources, where she hopes to affect environmental policy on Capitol Hill.

Dr. Chris Beyrer ’81, epidemiologist and professor at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, was interviewed on PBS News Hour Weekend on the 40th anniversary of the first documented cases of HIV/AIDS. An epidemiologist who has been on the frontlines of COVID-19 and HIV/AIDS, Dr. Chris Beyrer ’81 discussed the uneven parallels between the pandemics,

Four recent Hobart and William Smith alums have been admitted to some of the premier dental schools in the world, including programs at Harvard and the University of Pennsylvania. Between his coursework and summers “shadowing dentists and volunteering at health clinics,” Bartolomeo Voto ’21 is “confident that my time at HWS has prepared me for

With the support of a prestigious scholarship, Charlie Widing ’22 will research water purification techniques at the Technological University of Berlin this summer. Charlie Widing ’22, who has been studying water filtration at HWS, is the recipient of a Research Internship in Science and Engineering (RISE) from the German Academic Exchange Service. His three-month internship

“HWS research students are not laboratory assistants; they are co-investigators into our unknown world. They design experiments, collaborate within their labs, with other labs on campus often from other departments, and with labs at other institutions. Thanks to the Sherman Fairchild Foundation’s support and other ongoing initiatives, we anticipate the number of research students on campus this summer to reach an all-time high,” says Associate Dean for Faculty Development and Affairs Joe Rusinko.

Using water pressure and a series of filters, reverse osmosis is a common method of water purification. But as Noah Kilmer ’21 explained in his recent Senior Symposium presentation, it “has been plagued by biofouling, which is the buildup of biological material that makes the membrane less efficient, much like the buildup of leaves at the end of a gutter.”

Two novelists and a biologist discuss storytelling, science and what is illuminated at the confluence of fiction and nonfiction. In bestselling author Jeff VanderMeer’s new novel, Hummingbird Salamander, a mysterious envelope sends “Jane Smith” on a dangerous, complex quest revolving around a taxidermied hummingbird and a taxidermied salamander. The titular animals are fictional, but their scientific