+ chemistry – Hobart and William Smith Colleges \
The HWS Update

Students present at the annual Rochester area science conference. At the Rochester Academy of Sciences’ annual fall conference, HWS students presented on topics ranging from water contamination to evolutionary relationships among plant species, describing not only their research but how it’s likely to impact the world outside the lab. Accompanied by Assistant Professor of Chemistry

This summer, chemistry students and faculty searched for solutions to the harmful effect contaminants have on the water supply. As members of Assistant Professor of Chemistry Elana Stennett’s research group this summer, Kara Gilleland ’23, Lauren Jackson ’23 and Alexandra Davidson ’24 investigated chemical interactions that facilitate or hinder water purification — research with important

In the fall, Matthew Nardone ’21 will attend Syracuse University to pursue a master’s in audio arts. Building on his double majors of biochemistry and music, Matthew Nardone ’21 looks forward to graduate work at Syracuse University’s Audio Arts program. “Part of me always wanted to work in the behind-the-scenes parts of the music industry, but

With the support of a prestigious scholarship, Charlie Widing ’22 will research water purification techniques at the Technological University of Berlin this summer. Charlie Widing ’22, who has been studying water filtration at HWS, is the recipient of a Research Internship in Science and Engineering (RISE) from the German Academic Exchange Service. His three-month internship

“HWS research students are not laboratory assistants; they are co-investigators into our unknown world. They design experiments, collaborate within their labs, with other labs on campus often from other departments, and with labs at other institutions. Thanks to the Sherman Fairchild Foundation’s support and other ongoing initiatives, we anticipate the number of research students on campus this summer to reach an all-time high,” says Associate Dean for Faculty Development and Affairs Joe Rusinko.

Using water pressure and a series of filters, reverse osmosis is a common method of water purification. But as Noah Kilmer ’21 explained in his recent Senior Symposium presentation, it “has been plagued by biofouling, which is the buildup of biological material that makes the membrane less efficient, much like the buildup of leaves at the end of a gutter.”

HWS welcomed the first cohort of STEM Scholars this month, celebrating the launch of the new program supporting racially and ethnically underrepresented scholars in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. In March, 15 HWS students were inducted to the new STEM Scholars program, which is designed “to elevate and recognize the importance and value of historically

Sarah Lewicki ’21 is the recipient of a prestigious award that will support up to two years of hands-on biomedical research training at the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. This spring, the National Institutes of Health selected Sarah Lewicki ’21 for a highly competitive Postbaccalaureate Intramural Research Training Award. The award

“The wealth of opportunity and academic rigor here at HWS have been crucial in preparing me for this next step. I am extremely grateful to my coaches, professors, friends and family for helping me along the way,” says Alec Robitaille ’21.

Kevin Stein ’88 has established an endowed fund to support on-campus summer science research opportunities like those he had as a student. Fond memories of his experiences as a Hobart student, coupled with participation in a digital event held this fall about the Colleges’ summer science research programs, has inspired Kevin Stein ’88 to create