+ genocide – Hobart and William Smith Colleges \
The HWS Update

Billions of dollars, millions of miles, uncertain outcomes. “Why are we doing this? It’s about this question of life on Mars,” John Grotzinger ’79, Sc.D. ’13 told the audience gathered for his lecture at HWS on Tuesday night. The former mission leader for NASA’s Mars Science Laboratory, Grotzinger returned to campus to share the results

At the Jewish Federation of Greater Rochester, Sarah Walters ’19 is using the knowledge she developed through her Genocide, Human Rights, and Peace Action major as the agency’s first Holocaust Education and Community Relations Program Director. Combining her interests and study, the position allows Walters to connect with a range of people in a new community

Pulitzer Prize-winning Washington Post journalist Eli Saslow discussed the threat of white nationalism and his 2018 book Rising Out of Hatred, which tells the story of how a prominent white supremacist rejected the ideology after enrolling at a small liberal arts college. Saslow’s lecture, organized by the Human Rights and Genocide Symposium and funded by Dr. Edward Franks ’72, was

When it came time for Professor of Geoscience Nan Crystal Arens to teach a data science class, she took an entrepreneurial approach. Rather than only work with students from her own discipline, she saw an opportunity to bring together students from diverse fields, including psychology, economics, sociology and computer science. In the fall of 2019,

In a recent article in the Miami Herald, Professor of Religious Studies Michael Dobkowski discusses rhetoric around the ongoing political and humanitarian crisis in Venezuela, and where the rhetoric misses the mark. The article — “Rick Scott is using a word to describe Venezuela that no one else is. Is he right?” — reports on

The Hobart and William Smith Colleges’ Department of Religious Studies hosted a performance of Survivors, a new play that recounts stories from the Holocaust. The show was part of the Colleges’ Human Rights and Genocide Symposium performed on the stage of the Smith Opera House in Geneva. Survivors was crafted from the words and experiences

In 1942, German government officials and SS leaders gathered in the Berlin suburb of Wannsee and formalized implementation of and support for the Final Solution, the plan to commit genocide against Jews. This meeting, and its aftermath, is the subject of the traveling exhibit “The Wannsee Conference and the Persecution and Murder of the European Jews,” which was

Pulitzer Prize-Winning Author and Historian Heather Ann Thompson is set to visit Hobart and William Smith Colleges on Thursday, March 7 to discuss her highly acclaimed book, Blood in the Water: the Attica Prison Uprising of 1971 and its Legacy. Sponsored by the The Human Rights and Genocide Symposium, the talk will take place in

As part of the HWS Human Rights and Genocide Symposium, Matthias Hass, an expert on the 1942 Wannsee Conference, will speak at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 7 in the Geneva Room of the Warren Hunting Smith Library. His talk “The Wannsee Conference: Survivors, Victims and Perpetrators” will discuss the meeting between German government officials

The Abbe Center for Jewish Life presented the documentary The Children of Chabannes, which tells the story of a group of French villagers who saved the lives of more than 400 Jewish children during World War II. The film’s director Lisa Gossels joined the HWS community and led a discussion following the film’s showing on  Jan.