Chin’s Exhibit Captures 2020 Storm Season – Hobart and William Smith Colleges \
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Chin’s Exhibit Captures 2020 Storm Season

Part of a national juried exhibition at the Cape Cod Museum of Art, Associate Professor of Art and Architecture Christine Chin’s “Stuffed Storms” commemorates and interrogates the 2020 storm season.

Associate Professor of Art and Architecture Christine Chin’s “Stuffed Storms” is among the pieces on display at the Cape Cod Museum of Art’s INSIGHT exhibition. Made from archival ink prints on fabric that is then stuffed, topstitched and hand-embroidered, the series of wall-mounted storms in Chin’s piece depicts the unusually strong and frequent storm activity in the Atlantic Ocean last year.

As Chin explains in her artist’s statement: “2020 was an exceptional year in so many respects. One of those was the number and severity of the Atlantic Storm Season. There were so many storms that we blew through the pre-approved list of 21 alphabetical names for the season (Q, U, X, Y, and Z are not used) and then used the Greek alphabet up to Iota, the last named storm of the Atlantic season. The higher planetary temperatures are believed to contribute to the formation and ferocity of storms over the oceans. This art work commemorates and interrogates the 2020 storm season in a series of beautiful and terrible NOAA images.”

INSIGHTS, which opened in March and runs through June 20, features 65 works from 60 artists in 16 states, selected by juror Grace Hopkins, artist and gallery director at Berta Walker Galleries.

View “Stuffed Storms.”

“Stuffed Storms” was initially exhibited in January at State of the Art Gallery in Ithaca, N.Y.

Chin earned her B.A. from Princeton University, M.A. from Purdue University, and M.F.A. from the University of New Mexico. Since joining the faculty in 2008, she has been a Fisher Center Research Fellow and was awarded a Digital Pedagogies Grant and a Faculty Teaching Grant from the Center for Teaching and Learning.

While her art is always evolving, Chin most frequently builds ephemeral sculptural objects in the studio that she incorporates into her photographic storytelling. Her art often makes humorous and ironic commentary on contemporary issues of technology and the environment. Recent projects have addressed genetically modified food, alternative energy, artificial intelligence and biotechnology in medicine, and have been shown nationally and internationally.